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History

01.

Neolithic

Pozoba, Ferreruela, Gerrera, Ferrera, Herrera—with its many surnames such as del Duque, de la Serena or del Castillo—are the many names by which this place has been known throughout the ages, starting with the early Neolithic settlements that left their mark in the cave paintings of the Cuevas de la Panda.

02.

Roman Settlement

Hallmarks of their history can be found in the Cerro de la Barca site with oriental influences, the strategic strongholds like the one of Azuche, the decorative warrior stelae in Quinterías, the necropolis of Jardal, and the inscriptions of the Roman settlement of the Posadillas.

03.

Middle Ages

Following the reconquest by Alfonso Téllez de Meneses (13th century), Herrera expands in the late Middle Ages under the lordship of the Belalcázar county, linked to Puebla de Alcocer together with the lordships of García de Toledo, Bernat de Cabrera and Sotomayor. It is bestowed with the Catalonian “Carta puebla” title, a distinct lordship regime from the 14th century that opened the door to its rights as township.

02.

Extremadura

Following the reconquest by Alfonso Téllez de Meneses (13th century), Herrera expands in the late Middle Ages under the lordship of the Belalcázar county, linked to Puebla de Alcocer together with the lordships of García de Toledo, Bernat de Cabrera and Sotomayor. It is bestowed with the Catalonian “Carta puebla” title, a distinct lordship regime from the 14th century that opened the door to its rights as township.

Administrative Constituency of La Siberia

This region is on the Northeast side of Badajoz Province, at the crossroads of Cáceres, Toledo, and Ciudad Real, right by the Portillo de Cijara and neighboring the Serena, Las Villuercas, the La Jara regions, as well as the Alcudia and Pedroches valleys.

A borderland, it belongs to all and to no one, framed by the Guadiana river bend, an island amongst the Toledo mountains, the La Mancha plains, Sierra Morena and Extremadura.

All of this, combined with its limited accessibility and the distance from the main commercial and administrative hubs, together with its mountainous and fierce character, has led to the marginalization of this region and its being nicknamed “Extremadura’s Siberia” (Desiderio Vaquerizo).

More History

Herrera Under Toledo

By the end of the 18th century, Herrera still belonged to the Puebla de Alcocer Viscounty, under the lordship of the houses of Benavente, Béjar, Osuna and Gandía, who ruled over the jurisdiction.

With regards to legal matters, in 1790 it detached itself from the Granada chancellorship and came under the auspices of the new Royal Audience of Extremadura, which since its foundation had its seat in Cáceres.

Over many decades, Herrera was constantly subjected to the changing territorial divisions introduced by the minister Floridablanca (1785) and the provincial division of 1833, which decoupled it from Trujillo and established the province of Badajoz, of which it became a judicial district.

In ecclesiastic terms, Herrera has belonged to Toledo since it was reconquered in the first third of the 13th century. Currently, it is one of the three archpriesthoods of the primacial diocese in Badajoz.